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Using Children's Literature to Teach Writing: No, David!
Grade Level(s): 3-5
By: Tina Kates, Third Grade

Review beginning, middle, and end of a story and how details add to a story.

Objectives:

Review beginning, middle, and end of a story and how details add to a story.

Materials:

  • No, David! by David Shannon
  • Narrative Graphic Organizer
  • Proofreading Marks
  • Blank books (4 pages)
  • Markers (6 different colors)
  • Small treat (ie, Teddy Grahams)

Plan:

  1. Read aloud No, David! to class.
  2. Discuss what is the Beginning, Middle, and End. Write pupils' responses on the graphic organizer.
  3. Tell the class that they are going to help the author use more details so that older kids will want to read his story.
  4. Pass out 3 to 4 small snacks to each kid. For each beneficial idea, that child may eat a treat. A kid may also eat a treat if he/she piggy backs of another kid's idea.
  5. Have kids give details to support the beginning, middle, and end (EX: Main Idea: David can't go outside. Detail: When he woke up, it was raining).
  6. After completing the graphic organizer with the class, rewrite on paper and make copies so that each child will have their own.
  7. Give each kid their own graphic organizer. Tell them that they're going to use their graphic organizer to write our version of No, David!
  8. As a class use the graphic organizer and other beneficial ideas and write the introduction in one color, the beginning in another color, the middle in another color, the end in another color, and the conclusion in another color.
  9. Pass out Proofreading mark page. Explain what the purpose of the marks and what each mark means. Edit rough draft.
  10. Type the edit rough draft on a color printer. Print enough for each child.
  11. Pass out the blank books and the colored coded compositions. Tell the kids to copy their version onto the blank books.
Book format:
  • Page 1: Title
  • Page 2: Introduction/beginning
  • Page 3: Middle
  • Page 4: End

**The text will be written on the bottom of page with an illustration towards the top of the page that supports the text.

Comments:

I teach at an At-risk, Title One school and have used this lesson on many occasions. Not only do I get my kids hooked on the idea of writing by having them rewrite this hilarious story, but it causes them to want to share their writing with others.

 


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